About Gerald Moore

CAREER AT LIFE MAGAZINE

Gerald Moore was born in Albuquerque, New Mexico in 1938. He studied philosophy at the University of New Mexico and economics at the University of Washington in Seattle. While a student, he served for two years on the Albuquerque police department before becoming a reporter for the Albuquerque Tribune in 1963. At the Tribune he worked general assignment stories, covered county government in Bernalillo and Valencia counties and wrote a weekly column “Moore on the Arts.” Hired by Life Magazine in 1965, he moved to New York City where he worked as a reporter in Life’s entertainment department. Six months later, he was assigned to the Los Angeles bureau as a correspondent. He wrote articles on the advent of LSD, on racial tensions in Watts, profiles of entertainment figures and a major article on the politics of college students.

He was named Midwestern (Chicago) Bureau Chief in 1967. He wrote about prison conditions, directed Life’s coverage of the1968 Democratic convention, covered the campaign of Senator Eugene McCarthy and reported on conditions in Chicago’s West Side ghetto. He returned to New York City as an Associate Editor. In 1970 he was named Senior Editor and assigned responsibility for Life’s news department.

Gerald Moore was born in Albuquerque, New Mexico in 1938. He studied philosophy at the University of New Mexico and economics at the University of Washington in Seattle. While a student, he served for two years on the Albuquerque police department before becoming a reporter for the Albuquerque Tribune in 1963. At the Tribune he worked general assignment stories, covered county government in Bernalillo and Valencia counties and wrote a weekly column “Moore on the Arts.” Hired by Life Magazine in 1965, he moved to New York City where he worked as a reporter in Life’s entertainment department. Six months later, he was assigned to the Los Angeles bureau as a correspondent. He wrote articles on the advent of LSD, on racial tensions in Watts, profiles of entertainment figures and a major article on the politics of college students. He was named Midwestern (Chicago) Bureau Chief in 1967. He wrote about prison conditions, directed Life’s coverage of the 1968 Democratic convention, covered the campaign of Senator Eugene McCarthy and reported on conditions in Chicago’s West Side ghetto. He returned to New York City as an Associate Editor. In 1970 he was named Senior Editor and assigned responsibility for Life’s news department.

RECENT CAREER AND FREELANCE WRITING

When Life ended publication as a weekly magazine in December of 1972, Moore turned to freelance magazine writing. His articles appeared in People, Saturday Evening Post, Reader’s Digest, Families, Horticulture and other national magazines.

In 1985, Moore joined the New York State Department of Agriculture as Public Information Officer, a position that allowed him to assume an active role in encouraging environmentally sound agricultural practices, a lifelong interest that began when he worked as a teenager on his father’s irrigated farm in Eastern New Mexico. During his tenure, he assisted the implementation of a number of initiatives to lessen the environmental impact of agriculture, including a major program to change farming practices in the Upstate New York City watershed to better protect the city’s water supply. He drafted speeches on agriculture and the environment for three agriculture commissioners and for Governor Mario M. Cuomo. In 1996, Moore returned to New York City when he was recruited to assist Consolidated Edison in improving its environmental practices after the utility

gerald-author-photoplead guilty to federal felony charges relating to environmental malpractice. Placed on federal probation, the company was directed to carry out a company-wide program to build a corporate culture respectful of and compliant with environmental laws and regulations. Reporting directly to Consolidated Edison Vice President Peter Lanahan, Moore developed a multi-media program to meet the court’s mandate. When the company was released from probation in 2002, Moore left to begin work on the a memoir: LIFE Story: The Education of an American Journalist.

gerald-author-photo

When Life ended publication as a weekly magazine in December of 1972, Moore turned to freelance magazine writing. His articles appeared in People, Saturday Evening Post, Reader’s Digest, Families, Horticulture and other national magazines.

In 1985, Moore joined the New York State Department of Agriculture as Public Information Officer, a position that allowed him to assume an active role in encouraging environmentally sound agricultural practices, a lifelong interest that began when he worked as a teenager on his father’s irrigated farm in Eastern New Mexico. During his tenure, he assisted the implementation of a number of initiatives to lessen the environmental impact of agriculture, including a major program to change farming practices in the Upstate New York City watershed to better protect the city’s water supply. He drafted speeches on agriculture and the environment for three agriculture commissioners and for Governor Mario M. Cuomo.

In 1996, Moore returned to New York City when he was recruited to assist Consolidated Edison in improving its environmental practices after the utility plead guilty to federal felony charges relating to environmental malpractice. Placed on federal probation, the company was directed to carry out a company-wide program to build a corporate culture respectful of and compliant with environmental laws and regulations. Reporting directly to Consolidated Edison Vice President Peter Lanahan, Moore developed a multi-media program to meet the court’s mandate. When the company was released from probation in 2002, Moore left to begin work on the a memoir: LIFE Story: The Education of an American Journalist.